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Typical Configuration of Pump in Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (P&ID)

Since I have involved in the current project, which is EPC project, I always want to make some short writing and simple guideline to create piping and instrumentation diagram (P&ID) for several equipments, such as pump, tank, vessel, compressor, and so on. This post will be my first post on simple guideline related to configuration of pump in piping and instrumentation diagram.

Typical Configuration of Pump on PID
Typical Configuration of Pump on PID

Figure above reprsents typical piping and instrumentation diagram of pump. Pump should have:

  1. Pump Symbol. Make sure you use proper pump symbol. As for example above, I use centrifugal pump.  Check your P&ID legend
  2. All the nozzles should be correctly represented with size and flanges. Generally, the suction and discharge nozzles on the pump are smaller than suction and discharge line sizes. Appropriate reducer / expander to be clearly indicated in such cases.
  3. Strainer. In the example above, I install Y-strainer. The strainer is used to separate debris from the liquid
  4. Check valve. Check valve shall be installed to prevent liquid flow reversal with the succession of pumping
  5. Globe valve. Globe valve installed at discharge line to regulate the flow of liquid
  6. Pressure gauges are normally to be provided on suction and discharge  line
  7. Inlet and outlet lines are the next to be drawn up. Line number, material class, size, pressure rating, etc. is to be correctly assigned to each of the lines.
  8. Drains and vents to be provided on the suction / discharge lines

Source.

Creating Piping and Instrumentation Diagram: My Real Experiences

Example of P&ID
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/p-id-piping-instrumentation-diagram-d_466.html

As already described in previous posts (such as here and here), I was involved in EPC project. Creating piping and instrumentation diagram (P&ID) is one of my responsibility. I think P&ID is a collection of information and collaboration of every discipline, such as process, mechanical, electrical, and instrumentation. Once I think creating P&ID is easy enough, but I change my mind then. It is not.

I revised my P&ID (water treatment plant, fuel supply system, and wastewater treatment plant) several times. I am not quite sure if I am a kind of diligent person, but I am sure creating “perfect P&ID” requires a lot of works and patience. I sometimes think there’s nothing wrong with my P&ID. However, if you let someone, for example your colleagues, your boss, or someone with more experiences than you to check your P&ID, you will laugh at yourself. It happened to me. My P&ID was far from perfect. I understand now. Perfect P&ID requires continuous improvement. (more…)